From: janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au
To: ken@globalagoras.org, TRflanagan@aol.com, bayl0061@flinders.edu.au, chou0032@flinders.edu.au, defr0010@flinders.edu.au, entr0002@flinders.edu.au, haze0027@flinders.edu.au, heap0002@flinders.edu.au, lead0014@flinders.edu.au, mcco0117@flinders.edu.au, mgon0001@flinders.edu.au, namj0002@flinders.edu.au, stir0020@flinders.edu.au, mack0212@flinders.edu.au, chris.williams@flinders.edu.au
CC: mack0212@flinders.edu.au
Sent: 3/8/2011 12:37:25 A.M. Eastern Standard Time
Subj: RE: Update on Democracy and Sustainability wiki


Dear Ken and class
· Thankyou for the very clear instructions.
· If anyone has difficulties
· Plse ring me on 82012075
· I am happy to help you
· Remember to book Saturday the 2 April at 9am for our conversation.
· This will be on line
· You will be sent a ‘ go to a meeting link’
· Do not be scared to click on the link
· To talk you will need some headphones
· Ensure that your computer has a microphone-
· If you are an on campus student – you can come to my office on Sat 2 March and we can use my computer.

It is not hard!
Warm regards
Janet

Assoc Prof Janet McIntyre
Higher Degrees Co-ordinator
School of Social and Policy Studies

Flinders University
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide
5001
Australia
08 82012075
Fax 61 882013350
email janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au
CRICOS Provider Code : 0014A
Adjunct Professor, University of Indonesia, 2009 -

From: Ken Bausch [mailto:ken@globalagoras.org]
Sent: Tuesday, 8 March 2011 12:52 PM
To: TRflanagan@aol.com; bayl0061@flinders.edu.au; chou0032@flinders.edu.au; defr0010@flinders.edu.au; entr0002@flinders.edu.au; haze0027@flinders.edu.au; heap0002@flinders.edu.au; lead0014@flinders.edu.au; mcco0117@flinders.edu.au; mgon0001@flinders.edu.au; namj0002@flinders.edu.au; stir0020@flinders.edu.au; mack0212@flinders.edu.au; Chris Williams; Janet McIntyre; ken@globalagoras.org
Subject: Update


Dear class,

At our orientation meeting yesterday, Professor McIntyre, Dr. Flanagan, and I made the following decisions:
· The first three weeks of the coursed will be asynchronous. That is, there will be no obligation in those weeks for you to attend online meetings.
· In the fourth week, all of you will participate in a three-hour, interactive online meeting in which you will plot the influences that the Continuous Critical Problems have on each other. This meeting will be on either Saturday April 2 or Sunday April 3, at a time you will agree upon.

· The essential texts for this course are:

o The online text book: A Democratic Approach to Sustainable Futures. A draft of this not yet published book is attached.
o The class wiki http://predicament-retrospective2011.wikispaces.com
o The readings indicated in the syllabus.
· Research and reports on your assigned Continuous Critical Problems
o Your assignments were emailed to you. They can also be found on the class wiki.
o You are to research your assigned wikis on line (good leads are contained in Chapter 6 of the attached text book.
o For each CCP, you are to write a three page summary of your research. If you are assigned 4 CCPs you will complete 12 pages of research. These pages will then account for 12 of the 45 pages required for the completion of this class. DO NOT POST THESE PAGES ON THE CLASS WIKI.
o Condense the meaning of each of your CCPs into a short paragraph. Post those paragraphs on the wiki. (See detailed instructions on the wiki.)
o You are encouraged to begin your research now, By the end of the first week, all these short paragraphs need to be be posted on the wiki, so that the clarification phase of the course can proceed.

· This email and all relevant emails can be found on the class wiki by clicking on the Recent Changes button in the top left column.

· I will be sending you weekly updates as the class progresses.

Your work on the 49 CCPs is crucial to our common effort to understand of the global problematique. This will be an interesting adventure.

Ken Bausch




To: bayl0061@flinders.edu.au, chou0032@flinders.edu.au, defr0010@flinders.edu.au, entr0002@flinders.edu.au, haze0027@flinders.edu.au, heap0002@flinders.edu.au, lead0014@flinders.edu.au, mcco0117@flinders.edu.au, mgon0001@flinders.edu.au, namj0002@flinders.edu.au, stir0020@flinders.edu.au, mack0212@flinders.edu.au, chris.williams@flinders.edu.au, janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au, ken@globalagoras.org
CC: tom@globalaboras.org
Sent: 3/6/2011 11:57:44 A.M. Eastern Standard Time
Subj: instructions for an orientation meeting of Democracy and Global Sustainability



Dear class members.


We are concerned that the class has not yet enabled SKYPE conference calling capacities. As a second option, we are opening up the classroom early so that we will have another means of connecting.


1. Please join the orientation meeting for the Democracy and Global Sustainability course on , Sunday, March 6 at 5:30 PM Eastern Standard Time / Monday, March 7 at 9:00 AM local time at Flinders University.

https://www3.gotomeeting.com/join/550606518

2. Use your microphone and speakers (VoIP) - a headset is recommended. Or, call in using your telephone.

Dial +1 (415) 363-0071
Access Code: 550-606-518
Audio PIN: Shown after joining the meeting

Meeting ID: 550-606-518

GoToMeeting®
Online Meetings Made Easy™




  • Hello everyone
  • · I am glad that you have started to talk on FLO
  • · Here is the material for Week 2
  • · In order to demonstrate a discussion on complex problems we are going to use a wiki
  • · This wiki will help to map out arguments
  • You will learn by being involved
  • http://predicament-retrospective2011.wikispaces.com/ is ready for the class of 2011.

We will consider many issues such as stewardship of water and energy resources as well as the management of diverse viewpoints on consumption, property, creativity and convergence in living standards to enhance resilience - defined as ‘adaptive capacity…of the physical environment, of an individual or of a group. ... it concerns factors such as the capacity of members of a community to act together … and to be able to modify or even transform, existing ways of life should it become necessary so to do….” (Hulme 2009:163).
  • The environment affects people through the quality of the air they breathe, water and agriculture, for example. People in turn affect the environment through the way they think about their right to consume energy resources and their attitude towards protecting natural resources for future generations. We have a cultural relationship to the environment which impacts on climate change (Hulme, 2010). Accelerated climate change will adversely affect wellbeing and sustainability (Flannery, 2005, Singer, 2002, Wilkinson and Pickett, 2009) if we continue to consume at current rates. The impact has been underestimated (Lovelock, 2006, 2009, Rockström et al, 2009) by the Intergovernmental Panel (IPPC) on Climate Change (2001) and the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change (2007). The IPPC has concluded that the goal of reducing the carbon footprint should be 387 parts per million of carbon and Rockström et al (2009) have argued that it should be lower at 350 parts per million. The United Nations Human Development Index (2003) and World Wild Life Fund (2007) show that (with the exception of Cuba) no country in the world has achieved both quality of life and a sustainable ecological footprint. Some research shows that more equal societies are more responsible in their attitudes to resource use (Held, 2004, Wilkinson, 2009). The WWF (2007) stresses that the ecological footprint is now above the carrying capacity of the planet. At the current rate of consumption it will be 80-120 % above the carrying capacity (if not more) within the decade. The problem of how to control the use of water and energy resources in a sustainable and democratic way through governance and dialogue is the core of this sociological and public administration research. It builds on a completed ARC Linkage Grant LP056046 on decision making to narrow the gap between perceived needs and policy outcomes (McIntyre and de Vries, 2010a, b McIntyre-Mills, 2008a) with Aboriginal Australians on sustainable wellbeing that is increasingly recognised as a core to local transformations that are required to ameliorate climate change (Beck, 2010).
  • The conundrum we address is that nation states need to find ways to address the biggest challenge of the decade, namely to find a way to engage large groups of people effectively and to enhance a sense of shared responsibility for environmental management and consumption. We will consider the extent to which participation per se could help to promote rational decisions through combining cycles of open and structured dialogue that encourage people to think in terms of the consequences of their values about consumption and the nature of property (Bekker, 2007, Beck, 2005) for others and the next generation. This problem (Rittel and Webber, 1984) comprises multiple, diverse and interrelated variables. Different interest groups have different perceptions and values about the consumption of energy and water. The views of Social democrats (Held, 2004, Wilkinson and Pickett, 2009), Green Democrats (Dryzek, 2010), Indigenous people (Atkinson, 2002, Beherendt, 2007, Coates, 2010), Communitarians (Etziioni, 2004) and Cosmopolitans (Becker, 2007, Beck, 2010, Hulme, 2011) have implications for the:
  • · Administration of resources based on the way development, property and consumption are defined and
  • · Inclusion of the marginalized in policy decisions (Romm, 2010, Wadsworth, 2010).
  • The process of participation is the subject of recent research on 'identity, democracy and sustainability’ (McIntyre-Mills, 2011) and indicates that participation enhances social inclusion and greater attachment to policies that are made (McIntyre-Mills 2003, 2010). The ‘best- worst’ option, namely democracy is in need of improvement (Hulme, 2009, Giddens, 2009, Sagan, 1994).
  • The specific challenge that this research addresses is to match forms of appropriate participation that are accessible to diverse groups and not viewed with cynicism (Cooke, 2004). Social inclusion through participation is routinely cited to be desirable, because it is central to the enlargement of European democracy, which is fraught with difficulties (Cameron, 2004).
  • If nation states are going to achieve regional democracy and governance, it is vital to find ways of matching appropriate forms of social inclusion and governance, in order to build solidarity across diverse interest groups. Significantly these questions assesses whether participatory democracy and governance enhances sustainable living and wellbeing. It involves exploring the viability of different forms of engagement with diverse participants ranging from face- to- face dialogue to engagement via an interactive website that is linked with the websites of participating local governments, schools, businesses and NGO organisations. It will identify: the decision making context; constraints to achieving outcomes; elements of three scenarios (denial of the need to change, too little action too late, sustainable long term adjustments); and key factors (variables) in facing up to the risks. The ability of governments to secure the environmental regions (Bell, 2009) - on which the cities depend- to deliver services and resources will impact on the liveability of our communities and human security within our region unless transboundary governance is achieved (Collins, 2010:39).
  • Significantly we investigate whether the architecture and processes of democracy could be enhanced by means of policies for social and environmental justice to enable participation by diverse stakeholders. Governance information systems have notoriously emphasised so-called ‘rational choices’ without taking into consideration the values, perceptions and diverse experiences of those who will be affected by policy decisions (Arendt, 1967, Burns, 2007
  • This is important, because current forms of engagement on sustainability issues involving large groups of diverse stakeholders have failed, as is evident by the United Nations Copenhagen Summit (COP15) which was unable to draw on the so-called ‘wisdom of crowds’ (Surowieki, 2005) and the difficulties in achieving significant governance controls at the Cancun Conference in 2010 (COP 16).
  • Dahl’s (1967) pessimism about choosing nested systems of governance - because democracy was designed for the city state - has long been overturned by the necessity to extend governance across regional boundaries in the interests of sustainability (Levin, 2006, Held, 2004
  • The problem of engaging large groups of diverse interest groups (Maloney et al 1994) is threefold. The tendency to think in linear terms (Rosenberg, 2002) is augmented by an attempt to summarise ideas, rather than exploring and engaging with people to enable them to think about the short, medium and long term consequences of their choices and to explore diverse values about status, consumption and property (Adkins, 2005, Bourdieu, 1999, Flood and Romm, 1996, Hulme, 2009) and the implication for ‘being the change’ (Haraway, 1991).
  • Regards
  • Janet

From: janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au
To: 'bay10061@flinders.edu.au', 'chou0032@flinders.edu.au', 'defr0010@flinders.edu.au', 'entr0002@flinders.edu.au', 'haze0027@flinders.edu.au', 'heap0002@flinders.edu.au', 'lead0014@flinders.edu.au', 'mcco0117@flinders.edu.au', 'mgon0001@flinders.edu.au', 'namj0002@flinders.edu.au', 'stir0020@flinders.edu.au'
CC: ken@globalagoras.org, TRflanagan@aol.com, gayle.underwood@gmail.com, chris.williams@flinders.edu.au
Sent: 2/27/2011 6:00:44 P.M. Eastern Standard Time
Subj: Plse download skype and provide SKYPE addresses

Dear Democracy and Sustainability Students
· Plse would you download and provide your skype addresses.
· Plse press reply all so that your colleagues also have the skype addresses.
· Plse also provide your phone numbers.
· This is to enable us to have a general chat on 7 March to prepare for the action learning on 14th March

Warm regards
Janet
Assoc Prof Janet McIntyre
Higher Degrees Co-ordinator
School of Social and Policy Studies

Flinders University
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide
5001
Australia
08 82012075
Fax 61 882013350
email janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au
CRICOS Provider Code : 0014A
Adjunct Professor, University of Indonesia, 2009 -

From: Janet McIntyre
Sent: Monday, 21 February 2011 1:49 PM
To: 'bay10061@flinders.edu.au'; 'chou0032@flinders.edu.au'; 'defr0010@flinders.edu.au'; 'entr0002@flinders.edu.au'; 'haze0027@flinders.edu.au'; 'heap0002@flinders.edu.au'; 'lead0014@flinders.edu.au'; 'mcco0117@flinders.edu.au'; 'mgon0001@flinders.edu.au'; 'namj0002@flinders.edu.au'; 'stir0020@flinders.edu.au'
Cc: 'Ken Bausch'
Subject: Democracy and Sustainability

Dear students

A very warm welcome to Democracy and (Global) Sustainability
Please introduce yourself to one another by explaining where you are based and how you hope to apply what you learn in the subject.


This subject is co-ordinated by Janet McIntyre and we are to engage in an action learning exercise lead by Ken Bausch and Thomas Flanagan . This will cover 5 weeks and it comprises the core of the subject.

Week 1 Welcome to the subject by Janet McIntyre with an explanation of the learning requirements and process.
Please read ‘ On misdirected systems’ for an overview of systemic thinking. Please read the Prologue and intro to “ Identity , democracy and sustainability’.

Modules are provided by Dr Bausch to guide the action learning over 5 weeks with workplans and details of how to log onto the wiki site

The assessment requirements are detailed under the Statement of Assessment. The 4500 word paper is the basis for the assessment. But unless you participate in the 5 weeks of action learning it will not be possible to write the paper entitled: Critically review a) the action learning and action research process b) the potential and pitfalls of structured web based dialogue for democracy and sustainability.

Flinders Learning on Line will provide the basis for the subject, but you will link to a web link that is sent to you by Ken and Thom.

Regards
Janet

Assoc Prof Janet McIntyre
Higher Degrees Co-ordinator
School of Social and Policy Studies

Flinders University
GPO Box 2100
Adelaide
5001
Australia
08 82012075
Fax 61 882012273
email janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au
CRICOS Provider Code : 0014A
Adjunct Professor, University of Indonesia, 2009 -